PicShrink 2.3 Release Next Week

Grab the new version of PicShrink Image Compressor with a couple of new features:

- Overwrite original images – You can now actually compress your complete photo archive while your archive folder structure remains untouched.

- Keep EXIF-Data when compressing images – In earlier versions EXIF data was deleted when compressing your photos. Now you have the option to keep all original file information.

- No format change – Open up different file formats at once and compress them without having their original file format changed

The new Version of PicShrink will be available on www.PicShrink.com in the upcoming days. Stay in touch!

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Probably our youngest fan… A must see

While surfing Youtube I stumbled upon this video. It´s made by Jacob probably our youngest fan. He made a great video demonstrating our software PicShrink. Thank you so much for your effort of creating such a cool video.
Watch the video below or visit Jacobs homepage here.

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PicShrink 2.2 now supports tiff format

As previously announced PicShrink is updated once again. Version 2.2 now makes extremely comfortable to convert your JPGs to TIF or your TIF images to JPG.

To create TIF Images from JPG, GIF or PNG you have the option to choose between the RGB and CMYK color mode. To make a professional printable TIF image it is necessary to choose the CMYK color mode

Use LZW compression to create temporary compressed files to keep the file size small. LZW compression has no influence on the quality of your image.

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Convert JPG to BMP

Open the JPG image in PicShrink Image Compressor. Go to the “Output Format” Tab and Select BMP. Then press the Start button.

The window “Output images” will appear, where you can choose the location you want to save the converted file to. The default location will be your desktop (a folder named “shrinked Pictures” will automatically appear. Press OK to finally convert the image.

Learn more by watching this step-by-step movie:

picshrink-convert-jpg-to-bmp

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Soon: Release of PicShrink 2.2

!Hot! Next week PicShrink 2.2 will be released. The updated version supports TIF format. Picshrink will convert all picture formats (JPG, PNG, GIF and BMP)  to TIF and vice versa. Convert your digicam pics into high Resolution CMYK TIFs for high quality prints. Stay tuned.

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Convert JPG to GIF

Open the JPG image in PicShrink Image Compressor. Go to the “Output Format” Tab and
Select GIF. Then press the Start button.

The window “Output images” will appear, where you can choose the location you want to save the converted file to. The default location will be your desktop (a folder named “shrinked Pictures” will automatically appear. Press OK to finally convert the image.

Have a look at the how to use movie: picshrink_convert-jpg-to-gif

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Convert JPG to PNG

Open the JPG image in PicShrink Image Compressor. Go to the “Output Format” Tab and Select PNG. Then press the Start button.

The window “Output images” will appear, where you can choose the location you want to save the converted file to. The default location will be your desktop (a folder named “shrinked Pictures” will automatically appear. Press OK to finally convert the image.

Watch this video showing step by step how to do it:

picshrink-convert-jpg-to-png

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Having Trouble Sending Images Via Email?

Have you ever had the perfect picture to send to your friends and family, only when you tried to upload it to your email, you received error message after error message? This probably happened because your image was too big and you did not use image compression before sending. Email programs, websites, and social networking sites all have limits on the sizes of images they support, and as digital cameras start capturing images with higher and higher resolutions, it becomes increasingly difficult to use those images online. [Read the rest of this entry...]

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RGB vs. CMYK – Screen vs. Print

You are designing your first digital artwork by creating own letterhead, business card or poster to get them professionally printed? Going down that path you might come along the question what a color mode is. And what color mode actually your design has. The color mode of a picture is described by the way colors are mixed to reproduce the impression of the object captured by your camera. But a color mode also is described by the way colors are mixed to reproduce the impression of the object printed by a printer. Now what we have here are two different ways to describe digitally the colors of an image. But why has it be so complicated? An image captured by a digital camera is in RGB Color mode which means the three additive primary colors, red, green, and blue are used to reproduce a broad array of colors. RGB Color Mode you might also know from your television set, from your computer screen or mobile phone display. All these devices have in common that they need light to produce what you see. Red green and blue reflected by the light create millions of colors. This basically means with RGB mode the possibilities of creating colors and the amount of different color shades is way bigger than the possibilities to print colors. To print a newspaper with coloured pictures the man who does the job basically has 4 colors to choose from: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black – CMYK. Those four colors mixed with each other offer the array of colours that the image will be printed with.

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The Scanner

Even if a scanner works technically different it surely is closely related to the digital camera. Only that a scanner does not transform an image of the world into pixels, but a paper or a dia. Scanners are perfect to archive old family photos which were originally printed on photo paper – back in the days.

In contrast to the camera, with which the objective captures and – based on the adjusted resolution – splits images from objects of any size or appearence into a given pixel lattice. with the Scanner the surface which needs to be captured has to be fix. Common Scanners usually have the Din-A4 Format.

The basic information for the scanner is the indication, which disctance has to be scanned and in which resolution this has to happen. The common unit to measure the distance/amount of pixels is usually expressed in: pixel by inches or briefly ppi.

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